Oct 152016
 

 

Be sure to read Part 1 before continuing

What to hold in a frozen investment account:

Remember that in your frozen account there is no rebalancing, no buying, no selling, no withdraw. You can take no action until you return to Canada and unfreeze. Good thing you are read this before you leave Canada and it’s not too late! Your ideal frozen funds should have these characteristics:

  • No dividends
  • No re-balancing required
  • Steady, reliable growth
  • Low fees
  • Allocations: 15% Canadian equity, 40% US equity,  25% International equity, and 20% bonds

If you are under thirty I’d normally suggest 10% in bonds, but since you can’t re-balance it’s best to give your slower growing bonds a head start. In a few years your entire portfolio will be higher(probably), but the bonds will have grown at a slower pace, reducing their share of the total. Ideally that 20% will be closer to 10% or 15% where it belongs. (and yes that will keep shrinking, but there’s really nothing we can do about it if your account is frozen for ten years or longer).

I’ve come up with two options: One single balanced fund, or a set of three or four stable ETFs. Amix of both will also work well:

Continue reading »

Sep 202015
 

So you own a few ETFs and you’re ready to optimize your accounts. Especially you rich chumps and chumpettes with taxable accounts! Well swap ETFs are a crazy scheme with the primary benefit being tax savings. I mean, what’s with these governments! How dare they use our hard earned money to pay for roads, schools, and fundamental basic services! Even the so called “Tax Free Savings Account” is subject to some foreign withholding taxes.

Never fear, your crazy uncle has a scheme for those taxes!

 


Get to the point! What’s a swap ETF?

Well let me break it down for you wizards. A swap ETF essentially turns dividends or interest income into capital gains. Why would you want that? Because foreign dividends and interest are taxed at your full income tax rate, meanwhile capital gains are only half that. If you make over $138,586 your federal tax rates will be like so: Continue reading »